DEVOTION

Wednesday, March 18, 2020


Good Afternoon my friends,

I want to check in with you all. I hope you’re well and keeping in touch with one another.


Below you will find a story from John’s Gospel translated into contemporary language by Eugene Peterson. I find Peterson’s work refreshing and John’s story compelling.


When reading John’s gospel, we must be wary. It has been long used by the Church to justify its anti-Judaism and anti-Semitic beliefs and actions. The term, “the Jews,” is used both positively, in reference to Jewish celebrations, etc., and negatively, referring to the religious authorities and opponents of Jesus. Remember, Jesus was a Jew.


Day and night, blindness and sight are important metaphors in the story. Also, notice the disbelief and hostility the man experiences as he slowly comes to faith by telling his story over and over again.


John 9:1-41

Walking down the street, Jesus saw a man blind from birth. His disciples asked, "Rabbi, who sinned: this man or his parents, causing him to be born blind?"


Jesus said, "You're asking the wrong question. You're looking for someone to blame. There is no such cause-effect here. Look instead for what God can do. We need to be energetically at work for the One who sent me here, working while the sun shines. When night falls, the workday is over. For as long as I am in the world, there is plenty of light. I am the world's Light."


He said this and then spit in the dust, made a clay paste with the saliva, rubbed the paste on the blind man's eyes, and said, "Go, wash at the Pool of Siloam" (Siloam means "Sent"). The man went and washed—and saw.


Soon the town was buzzing. His relatives and those who year after year had seen him as a blind man begging were saying, "Why, isn't this the man we knew, who sat here and begged?"


Others said, "It's him all right!"


But others objected, "It's not the same man at all. It just looks like him."


He said, "It's me, the very one."


They said, "How did your eyes get opened?"


"A man named Jesus made a paste and rubbed it on my eyes and told me, 'Go to Siloam and wash.' I did what he said. When I washed, I saw."


"So where is he?"


"I don't know."


They marched the man to the Pharisees. This day when Jesus made the paste and healed his blindness was the Sabbath. The Pharisees grilled him again on how he had come to see. He said, "He put a clay paste on my eyes, and I washed, and now I see."


Some of the Pharisees said, "Obviously, this man can't be from God. He doesn't keep the Sabbath."


Others countered, "How can a bad man do miraculous, God-revealing things like this?" There was a split in their ranks.


They came back at the blind man, "You're the expert. He opened your eyes. What do you say about him?"


He said, "He is a prophet."


The Jews didn't believe it, didn't believe the man was blind to begin with. So they called the parents of the man now bright-eyed with sight. They asked them, "Is this your son, the one you say was born blind? So how is it that he now sees?"